Path: Queen - Royal Legend - Facts: Sheer Heart Attack

Facts: Sheer Heart Attack

Brighton Rock

recording: It was originally for the second album. <true>

Greg Brooks (2002): "Brighton Rock was actually conceived for Queen II, but was not finished then and so was revisited at Wessex and Rockfield studios for Queen's third LP."

recording: Working names of the song included Happy Little Fuck, Happy Little Day, Blackpool Rock, Bognor Ballad, Southend Sea Scout, Skiffle Rock and Herne Bay. <true>

Greg Brooks (2002): "Happy Little Fuck was the working title of this song. It was further referred to as Happy Little Day, Blackpool Rock, Bognor Ballad, Southend Sea Scout, Skiffle Rock and Herne Bay. Session engineer Mike Stone is the likely culprit of some of the titles, though like most other bands, Queen frequently employed working titles during the song development process."

recording: Part of the intro sounds of this track are from a sound effect album the band was given. <true>

Brian (2003): "This was largely Serendipity!! We were signed to Jack Holzman's Elektra label in the USA at that time (along with the Eagles, Jackson Browne, and Linda Ronstadt) , and they had given us a bunch of sound effects albums - Which Jack Holtzman had apparently personally produced!!! I had noticed the fairground scene and pinched it wholesale for the beginning of the track !!! Of course, even if anyone from the record company had noticed (which I don't think they did ! - Jack was already long gone) - they wouldn't have stopped us because it was their own product."

 

Bring Back That Leroy Brown

recording: Brian played ukelele-banjo. <true>

Brian (1977): "The ukulele was incidental to that because it that was Freddie’s song. It had this kind of vaudeville atmosphere and I just thought the ukulele would go nicely on it and we worked beside it, so it could be done. And I managed to fiddle a little ukulele solo."

 


recording: The very low voice (going to a C1) is speeded down. <true>

Roger (1999): "I think we maybe cheated it with a bit of... I think we might have speeded the tape up a bit, so it sounded really deep..."

 


recording: Freddie played upright piano (aka jangle piano) besides the grand one. <true>

Peter Hince (2001): "The 'Jangle' Piano was an old upright piano - the make was Chappell I seem to remember. It means an old fashioned 'saloon or music hall' sound."

 

Dear Friends

recording: Brian played piano. <true>

Brian (2003): "For the record, as far as I remember, I played piano on Doin' All Right, Father To Son, Dear Friends, Now I'm Here, Teo Torriate and All Dead All Dead."

 

In The Lap Of The Gods ... Revisited

recording: The explosion is done through tape saturation. <true>

Brian (2001): "The explosion's meant to break up. It's totally intentional. We said, 'The explosion will be too big for the studio, so tape saturation will be a part of the sound."

 

Killer Queen

writting: Freddie wrote it in piano. <true>

John (1979): "The biggest factor of our music being lighter than in the early days is that in this point Freddie has developed more interest in the piano, because the song he writes in piano has the piano as base instrument, most likely. Liar in the first album was written on guitar, and naturally goes in the hard rock extreme, as opposed to Killer Queen. Freddie is now surrounded by Japanese furniture decoration and a grand piano, so the songs are written there. Simply, isn't it? But I doubt Roger writes songs on the drums."

 


recording: Freddie played upright piano (aka jangle piano). <true>

Peter Hince (2001): "The 'Jangle' Piano was an old upright piano - the make was Chappell I seem to remember. It means an old fashioned 'saloon or music hall' sound."

 

 Misfire

writting: It was the first song John wrote. <true>

John (1977): "It was just a tune I had in the air. That's the first time I wrote a song, so it sounds like an usual Freddie or Brian tune."

 

Now I'm Here

recording: Brian played piano. <true>

Brian (2003): "For the record, as far as I remember, I played piano on Doin' All Right, Father To Son, Dear Friends, Now I'm Here, Teo Torriate and All Dead All Dead."

 


recording: Some guitars at the end of the intro are speeded up. <true>

Brian (1999): "Speeding up the tape was a trick that I used on other Queen songs as well. For example, on Now I'm Here you can hear high bent A notes over the A chord (after the verses). These notes were also sped up (either a fifth or an octave - I don't quite recall) by slowing the tape down while recording them, then playing everything back at the original speed."

 

 

She Makes Me

recording: John played the acoustic. <true>

Peter Hince (2001): "John played the acoustic guitar."

 

Stone Cold Crazy

live performance: It was the first song played live by Queen. <true>

Freddie (1977): "Stone Cold Crazy was the first song Queen ever performed onstage."